Book Review: Annabel Lee by Mike Nappa

Title: Annabel Lee
Series: Coffey & Hill (#1)
Author: Mike Nappa
Publisher: Revell
Date: March 1st, 2016
Pages: 363
Format: Paperback
Source: from Publisher for review

 

Synopsis (from Goodreads): On a farm fourteen miles east of Peachtree, Alabama, a secret is hidden–a secret named Annabel Lee. Her uncle’s last words before he hid her away: “Don’t open that door for anybody, you got it? Not even me.”

Review:

Annabel Lee was somewhat interesting read.
It’s a suspense thriller, and I naively fooled myself into thinking I’d read horror (don’t even ask me how I managed to do it, I’ll just blame the cover) so my whole reading experience was similar to the one one would have if he turned on TV thinking he would watch House at the End of the Street, but ended up watching an episode of CSI Miami instead.

However, I enjoyed reading this book.

The story follows three perspectives: Trudy’s, Mute’s and Annabel Lee’s.
Two of them are told in third person (Trudi’s and Mute’s), while Annabel’s was written in first person (later in the story we find out that her perspective are actually pages from her diary).

The story talks about 11 years old girl, Annabel Lee, who’s uncle locked her in the basement (with his dog whom Annabel is afraid of) and gave her an order not to open the door to anyone, not even to him, without a secret code.

We don’t know why Annabel’s uncle Truck did what he did, nor was it done with an aim to protect Annabel, or protect someone else from Annabel.
We get an impression that Annabel is important, even special in a way, but we don’t know why.

Right after her put her in the basement, Annabel’s uncle was killed and Mute witnessed the murder.
Now, Mute’s mission is to keep the girl safe, before bad guys take her. In order to save her, Mute has to get her out of the basement, but he has no secret code.

That is where spouses from Coffey & Hill come in (Trudi and her ex husband Samuel). Samuel got the secret code from Truck years ago, and now all three of them work together to save Annabel.

Nappa’s writing style is solid and although this book reads quickly, the pacing is very slow, with lots of descriptions.

I enjoyed reading all of the perspectives, but Annabel’s POV was my favorite.
She is really smart, educated and patient little girl who gets under reader’s skin so easily.
Regardless, I have to state that I didn’t like how she often sounded like a 30 years old women, instead of like 11 years old girl that she is.

Mute was my best-loved character in this story.

What I liked the most was the relationship between the girl and her uncle’s dog.
It’s development was described so well, and I welcomed how at the very beginning anytime Annabel talks about the dog she calls him “it”, and along as the story progesses, “it” becomes “he”.

When it comes to the bad guy who wanted to take Annabel, his idea was mean, but yet genius at the same time.
I don’t want to sound weird here, but I kind of admired his purpose.

One thing that needs to be stressed is that Annabel Lee is piece of Christian fiction.
To be honest, I am not sure why is that, because I didn’t feel like anything religious was forced in this story (or maybe I am just blind to those kind of things).
One thing that I noticed was that in the basement, among so many books, there was also a Bible.
And once, closer to the end of the novel, Annabel said something about Jesus and his purpose.
It was only one sentence and it felt more like a general thought.

This is the first book in the series, but the story it covered is completed.
In the next book, The Raven, we follow Trudi and Samuel solving another case.
I already have the book in my possession, and I plan to read it pretty soon, while the characters are still fresh in my mind.

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Book Review: The Chocolate Lovers’ Christmas by Carole Matthews

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Title: The Chocolate Lovers’ Christmas
Series: Chocolate Lovers’ Club (#3)
Author: Carole Matthews
Publisher: Sphere
Date: October 22nd, 2015
Pages: 496
Format: Paperback
Source: purchased

 

Synopsis (from Goodreads): Christmas is just around the corner but the women of The Chocolate Lovers’ Club have more to worry about than present shopping . . .

Lucy loves running Chocolate Heaven but she hasn’t spent time with her boyfriend, Aiden, in weeks. And then her ex-fiance turns up and things become even more complicated.

Nadia hasn’t let herself get close to a man in a long time, yet she can’t help feeling drawn to Jacob. Will he be her last chance for a happy ending?

Chantal and her husband, Ted, are besotted with their baby daughter Lana – but she’s not sure that’s enough to base a marriage on.

Autumn is dealing with a tragedy that has hit too close to home. But when she doesn’t get the support she needs from her fiance, will she look elsewhere for comfort?

Can friendship overcome all in . . . The Chocolate Lovers’ Christmas.

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Review:

If you’re into chick lit, you’re probably familiar with an author Carole Matthews.
She’s one of the most known writers of women’s fiction, with (I think) 30 novels written.
Also, her stories always come within the most adorable covers, so it’s hard not to pay attention to her work.

Being devoted reader of women’s fiction, I wanted to read her work for the longest time.
After few years of putting it off, I decided it was about time to finally grab one of those gorgeous paperbacks and start reading (plus TBD bargain section helped me to decide which one to choose).

The Chocolate Lovers’ Club is the third book in the series but it can be read as standalone.
However, if you want to read this book, I encourage you to read previous books first.
The reason why is because so many things happened in the first two books and, although an author mentioned them through the story and tried her best to keep new readers on track, I think that if I’d read the series in order, I would understand the characters better.

The story follows four women who are best friends whose love for chocolate connected them.
As the author herself said it in her letter to readers at the end of the book, the reason why she wrote this series is to show how women can be there for each other without judging one another.

I understand where she was coming from and I can say she solidly succeeded in her goal, but yet these women were so much different from where I come from, that even though I tried to go with an open mind into this story, at times it was really hard for me to understand them.
There is no girl code (one woman was one’s guy mistress and now her friend is dating him), with questionable morals (cheating and not knowing who your baby’s father is) and easy to fogive approach (becoming fast friend with your husband’s ex mistress who has his child (who’s by the way the same age as yours)).
If you’re a type of reader who avoids all of the above in their books, maybe this book is not for you.

The writing style is really, really good. I’d say it is the best part of this piece. Carole Matthews uses her words in a way that makes you fly through the story. That only is enough reason for me to want to read more of her work.

However, I wasn’t the biggest fan of how this book was concepted.
It follows four POVs, one of them (Lucy’s) written in first person and others all written in third person.
To be honest, I still don’t understand why Matthews chose to write her book that way.
For a really short period it gave me that Sex and the City vibe, in which Carrie tells the story, but then I realized that in those chapters that were written in third person when Lucy was mentioned, she was being Lucy, and not the person who tells the story, so that’s what confused me.

And while we’re talking about Sex and the City, I can say The Chocolate Lover’s Christmas is like a lighter version of it, only set in London and without parties.
Even some scenes reminded me of ones from that show. They would be amazing, if only they were original.

Overall, The Chocolate Lovers’ Christmas is a quick read perfect to put you into the festive mood, but if you don’t like not-so-smart protagonists nor promiscuity, you probably won’t like this novel either.

3

Early Book Review: Roseblood by A. G. Howard (Buddy Read)

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Title: Roseblood
Author: A. G. Howard
Publisher: Amulet, ABRAMS
Date: January 10th, 2017
Pages: 464
Format: Physical ARC
Source: from Publisher for a review

 

Synopsis (from Goodreads): In this modern day spin on Leroux’s gothic tale of unrequited love turned to madness, seventeen-year-old Rune Germain has a mysterious affliction linked to her operatic talent, and a horrifying mistake she’s trying to hide. Hoping creative direction will help her, Rune’s mother sends her to a French arts conservatory for her senior year, located in an opera house rumored to have ties to The Phantom of the Opera.

At RoseBlood, Rune secretly befriends the masked Thorn—an elusive violinist who not only guides her musical transformation through dreams that seem more real than reality itself, but somehow knows who she is behind her own masks. As the two discover an otherworldly connection and a soul-deep romance blossoms, Thorn’s dark agenda comes to light and he’s forced to make a deadly choice: lead Rune to her destruction, or face the wrath of the phantom who has haunted the opera house for a century, and is the only father he’s ever known.

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About our buddy read

I read Roseblood with Jasmine from How Useful It Is.

Her review should be live at the same time as mine, so make sure to visit her blog and read her review.

We both composed three questions for each other, and you can read my questions here on my blog (with our answers) and hers on her blog.

1. Have you seen/read Phantom of the Opera before you started this book?

Jasmine: I have seen a movie Phantom of the Opera and I liked it. I saw it a long time ago so my memory is sketchy. It’s cool that this book reference a lot about music, but the story just doesn’t grab my attention.

Irena: I saw Phantom of the Opera movie and I really, really liked it. It has been a while since the last time I saw it and now I think it would have been a good idea if I saw it once more before reading the book.

2. What do you think about the world building?

Jasmine: The world building could be interesting if all of the remaining 25% of the book can be spread out to the first 75% of the book. It has potential to be interesting.

Irena: The world building was done pretty confusing. I honestly think that it could have been done better, maybe if more things were explained at the first third of the book.

3. What part of the book do you find the most interesting?

Jasmine:  I find the remaining 25% of the book interesting, but at the same time, it becomes too much information because everything is being revealed at once.

Irena: The legend about Phantom was the most interesting part of the story. I read it twice because I didn’t want to miss anything.

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My Review:

I rarely feel guilty about writing my reviews, but this one is one of those rare cases when I do.
Why?
Because I was so excited for Roseblood. I even sent my review request to the publishing house Amulet Books, and, since so many book bloggers wanted to read this book, I know how privileged I am to have recieved a physical proof copy.

You can probably guess that my expectations for this novel were high. I read Howard’s Splintered and really enjoyed it, so when I found out about her retelling of Phantom of the Opera, one of the best musicals out there (which is based on the book I haven’t read), I was so excited. Roseblood quickly became one of my most anticipated new releases.

I am sad to say that this book wasn’t the best book I read this year. It wasn’t as excellent as I wanted for it to be. It was just good. And that is it. I can’t even say I loved it, I can only say that I loved some parts of it (like amazingly described images) and the rest I found to be confusing, boring or mediocre.

The story follows Rune who transfers to new school after a tragedy that happened.
On the very few pages we already can read one of tropes in ya fiction: a new girl finds herself opposite a school diva and becomes her rival.
I don’t mind tropes, they are tropes for a reason after all, and it is on the author how the certain story will develop, and how he/she is going to approach to a situation that most readers have already read about in some other story.
The reason why I’m mentioning it here is simply because I wanted to tell you that in that certain situation, I found myself on Kat‘s (school diva) side.

Rune was hard to connect with.

In whole honesty, it was really hard for me to connect with any of characters. Thorn was too mysterious at first (although as we get to know his story the whole book becomes so much better).
Side characters were intersting, but weren’t explored enough. Rune said she was friends with them, but we got to see them so rarely that when Rune was worried about their friendship, I couldn’t be concered. I just didn’t feel it.

The story itself is very confusing and it takes 150 pages for the story to become somewhat interesting.
150 pages is simply too long, and because I was confused most of the time troughout the whole book, I couldn’t help but wonder if I’m confused because I simply don’t understand the story (because English is not my first language, or maybe my brain cells just don’t work fast enough), or maybe the writer didn’t describe the world in a way to bring it closer to the reader, to make reader understand it better…

Also, I didn’t like how succubus/incubus thing was replaced with the word vampire at times, when these are two (or three if you want) words that mean totally different creatures, so there was no need to add more confusion to already confusing story.

My favorite book character was Diable. He was the ghost cat. Smart little guy! The way author described him made me imagine him as devon rex, so now I wonder what kind of cat breed was he.

The best part of the story is Legend about Phantom. I read it couple of times just to observe everything.

Last 80 pages are the most interesting and where everything starts to make sense.

I feel like, if I ever decide to reread Roseblood, I would enjoy it more.
I am still debating whether I would reread it, because it took me forever to finish it the first time around.
2,75

 

Book Review: Springtime at Cherry Tree Cottage by Cathy Woodman

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Title: Springtime at Cherry Tree Cottage
Series: Talyton St George (#10)
Author: Cathy Woodman
Publisher: Penguin Random House UK, Cornerstone
Date: March 24th, 2016
Pages: 496
Format: eARC
Source: from Publisher for a review

 

Synopsis (from Goodreads): It’s not easy being a female in a male dominated world, but Flick is more than up for the challenge. But is Talyton St George ready for her?

After years of training, horse-mad Flick has finally achieved her dream of becoming one of the few female blacksmiths in the country.

Her first job is in Talyton St George. The little cottage on the green where she is staying is idyllic, but she soon finds that the locals are sceptical about her ability to do the job, and she has to work twice as hard to prove herself.

Stunt rider Robbie Salterton is a bit of a local celebrity. He’s gorgeous, a devoted single father and gives free riding lessons to disadvantaged children in his spare time. In addition, he’s one of the few men in the village who doesn’t doubt her skill. Can one man really be that perfect? Flick’s not so sure.

However, the more she gets to know him, the more she realises he’s everything he seems to be. But with his legions of glamorous women vying for his attention, what on earth would he see in a tomboy like her?

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Review:

Reading this book was one of the best decisions that I have made this year (books whise).
My only regret is that I haven’t read it sooner, in spring, when it first came out.
I can imagine how beautiful it would be to enjoy this story somewhere outside, where you can smell flowers and hear little bees flying.
I loved this story, but I know I would enjoy it so much more if I read it under prior described conditions.

I fell in love with Talyton St George and it’s residents.
The beautiful nature, that Woodman described so well, took my breath away and made me want to transform myself there.
It also woke up my sentimentality, because I started to miss (I always miss it, but only suppress my longing every day of my life) the village I spent months, years visiting when I was little.

Springtime at Cherry Tree Cottage not only has beautiful nature, but also animals. Lots and lots of animals.
And horses. So many horses.
If you love horses, I guarantee you, you will love this book!

The writing style is so beautiful, so passionate. The writer grew up in a place similar to Talyton St George, and you can feel her love for that kind of surrounding.

The story follows Flick, a new woman in village, who came to Talyton St George to replace their local farrier while he’s in recovery, due to an operation.
Being farrier is usually a man’s work so when a woman comes to do a job, people question her ability and quality.
Therefore, she has to work hard to prove herself.

Robbie is a single father and a local celebrity.
When Flick starts working for him the chemistry is obvious, but he has a rule he sticks to. He doesn’t want to march around with a girl, until he is sure there is something serious between them. He doesn’t want his daughter to get attached to a woman who can easily go away from their lives. He doesn’t want for his daugter to end up with a broken heart.

I like how Maisie wasn’t just a kid in this story. Her role wasn’t just to be Robbie’s daughter, but she also had her own personality full of carisma and I, as a reader, couldn’t help but adore her, and I really enjoyed reading about her.
The only book that I can remember, in which a kid is not there just for sake of being there, but has so much personality, is My Life Next Door , where Goerge, one of the siblings, even though he’s a side character, won readers’ hearts with his personality.

There was an instant attraction between our main characters, but the love took time to develop.
I enjoyed reading scenes where the strong connection between Flick and Robbie was almost touchable, and that sweet temptation made me almost impatiant because I was ready for their happily ever after.

Springtime at Cherry Tree Cottage is a part of Talyton St George series, but it can be easily read as standalone.
It was my first time reading a book from this series and, even though I really, really enjoyed it, I believe that people who read previous books will appreciate it so much more because of the side characters who all showed up with their own stories in previous books. I can imagine that readers who connected with them before would be happy to revisit them in this novel.

After finishing this lovely story, I now want to read every single book in this series that came out prior this one.
It makes me so happy to know that there are another 9 books set in this beautiful little village.

4,5

Book Review: Christmas Under a Starlit Sky by Holly Martin (Blog Tour)

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I am so happy to be today’s host in Christmas Under a Starlit Sky blog Tour.
I want to say thank you to Holly Martin for giving me this opportunity.

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Blurb:

Step inside a beautiful winter wonderland where love, laughter and cosy nights by the fire will make this Christmas one to remember.

Neve Whitaker loves managing the Stardust Lake hotel. She gets to work alongside her wonderful family and she’s spending Christmas on the most enchanting, snow-covered island in Scotland. So why is her heart so heavy this festive season?

It might have something to do with the gorgeous actor Oakley Rey, the man she finished with before he left for California and the man she loves more than anything. With Oakley’s career in Hollywood soaring, Neve is convinced she’d only hold him back. She had to end it with him – at least that’s what she keeps telling herself.

But now she has a secret she’s struggling to keep, and when Oakley arrives on Juniper Island determined to win her back, Neve is thrown off balance. Will Neve’s fear of having her heart broken again push Oakley away for good, or is it time for her to take a leap of faith?

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Review:

Last month I read Christmas Under a Cranberry Sky and complitely fell in love with it.
In that book (first in this series), Holly Martin described perfectly a little town called Christmas, filled my heart with happines and woke up my Christmas Spirit.
When you finish a book that good, it is unusual thing that you except for it’s sequel to be highly enjoyable as well.

Unfortunately, what I expected did not happen.
Christmas Under a Starlit Sky was a solid sequel, but nothing more then that.
It was somewhat entertaining book with the happiest end and a lot of drama.
And that is what ruined the whole reading experience for me: DRAMA, DRAMA, DRAMA.

I couldn’t even enjoy the Christmas setting that Martin described in a really good way (but sensibly weaker then she did it in book 1), because the characters were all into their problems, always fighting or avoiding each other. And keeping secrets.

The main character Neve did one of those things I find manipulative and I pretty much HATE that kind of move(this happens pretty early in the book so I don’t feel like it’s a spoiler): she lied about her pregnancy to her future baby’s father, telling him he’s not a father to “protect” him because, of course, she’s the one who knows what is the best for him.

And practiacally the whole book was about Neve acting like some character from those Latino-American soup operas where the woman pushes away a guy, cries about him because she wants him back, loves him but acts like lunatic and plays the “victim” who believes she’s a hero by “sacrificing” her own happiness… Big eye roll….

Ivy’s story was so much better and more enjoyable.
Honestly, when I read parts about Ivy and Adam, it was like taking a breath of fresh air after being in smoke filled room.
However, I have to stress out that those parts weren’t perfect, but in comparison with Neve and Oakley’s parts, they felt light hearted (and that’s how I like for my festive reads to be).

Writing style is very good, fast paced and I expected nothing less from Holly Martin, judging by her other books I read this year.
She has the ability to pull you into the story with her words and make you read her books faster then you thought is possible, and because of that I admire her.

The ending was really good. It was the happiest ending there could be and I like how it all wrapped up and not one character from the series wasn’t left out.

3,5

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About the author:

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Holly has been writing for six years. She was shortlisted for the New Talent Award at the Festival of Romance. Her short story won the Sunlounger competition and was published in the Sunlounger anthology. She won the Carina Valentine’s competition at the Festival of Romance 2013 with her novel The Guestbook. She was shortlisted for Best Romantic Read, Best eBook and Innovation in Romantic Fiction at the Festival of Romance 2014. Holly lives in Bedfordshire.

Website * Twitter * Facebook * GoodReads * Amazon Page

Book Review: If the Magic Fits by Susan Maupin Schmid

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Title: If the Magic Fits
Series: 100 Dresses #1
Author: Susan Maupin Schmid
Publisher: Random House Children’s
Date: October 25th, 2016
Pages: 304
Format: eARC
Source: from Publisher for a review

 

Synopsis (from Goodreads): Inside an enchanted castle, there’s a closet—a closet with one hundred dresses that nobody ever wears. Dresses like those need a good trying-on, and Darling Dimple is just the girl to do it. When she tries on Dress Number Eleven, something unbelievable happens. She transforms into the castle’s Head Scrubber! It turns out that each dress can disguise her as someone else. And Darling is about to have an adventure that calls for a disguise or two…or a hundred.

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Review:

Do you still remember fairytales you enjoyed when you were young?
If you loved listening about enchanted castles and beautiful princesses, there’s a great chance you will love this story.

If the Magic Fits is a brand new fairytale, and it has everything a good fairytale should have: magic, dragons, friendly mouse, beautiful gawns that come to life at times, magical bird, princess, prince and a strong protagonist.

The only thing that this story does not have are witches.
BUT, you know that word that rhymes with the word witch, the one that describes someone’s personality?
Yeah, that one!
I’ll just say those kind of characters weren’t missing.

I wish I could go back in time and give the young myself this book so she could observe every single page of it.
I am sure 10 years old Irena would be in love with this story and it’s world.

The story follows 10 years old Darling who, at the very beginning of the story got a new job. She is in charge for ironning Princess’s clothes. While living and working in castle, she discoveres the beauty of magic that is presencing in the castle.
In the wardrobe full with old (or outdated) dresses, she decides it wouldn’t hurt if she tries one.
What she didn’t expect was that the dress will disguise her, give her a whole new look.
Looking as someone else, Darling starts an adventure as a spy who’s mission is to save Princess from people who want to use her position and harm the kingdom.

Ever since I heard about 100 Dresses series (back in March) I wanted to read it.
If you didn’t know, I am a huge fan of Flunked (Fairy Tale Reform School series) and the first book that pops up as a recommendation for it’s fans is – you guessed it – If the Magic Fits.
So I would lie if I told you my expectations weren’t high.
They were.
As a matter of fact, they were high as enchanted Empire State Building that yet has to be built in Enchantasia.

At first, I found it hard to get into the story. It took me around 40 pages until I started reading it at my normal reading speed.
I blame the fact that this book was written in the style that is similar to the writing style fairytales are written, and as English is not my native language, it took a while until I got used to it.
It also contents words that are not typical for every day life so that had some part too.

Darling was very likeable and admiration worth main character. She is strong, smart and a loyal friend.
The only thing that I could critise is how she acted too mature for 10 years old girl at times.
However, when you take in the picture the fact that she is an orphan since the day she was born, and all she ever did in her life was work, work, work, her acting mature and whise has some logic.

The story itself was very entertining.
I wouldn’t mind to see an animated movie based on this book some day (fingers crossed I will)!

This book is the first in the series, but the story it followed is completed, so it could be read as standalone.

I assume that the next book will follow Darling on some other adventure. Judging by If the Magic Fits, I imagine the next book will be a lot of fun and I can’t wait to read it.

Although this book would probably be a good read to readers of all age, I think that who will enjoy it the most are girls in age from 9 to 14.

4

Spells & Sorcery: Book Review + Giveaway (Blog tour)



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I am so happy to be today’s host for Spells & Sorcery Blog Tour.
This ya fantasy was pretty quick read for me and I want to say thank you to Giselle from Xpresso Tours for giving me this opportunity.

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Spells and Sorcery
S. Usher Evans
(Lexie Carrigan Chronicles, #1)
Publication date: October 4th 2016
Genres: Fantasy, Young Adult

You have magic.

One sentence, three words, four syllables. Enough to change my life forever. And I’m not talking about the whole spells and sorcery thing.

Lexie Carrigan thought the weirdest thing about her was she preferred watching documentaries and reading the newspaper to reality TV and Twitter. But on the eve of her fifteenth birthday, her aunt and sisters drop a bomb–she’s magical.

Now the girl who never made waves is blowing up her nightstand and trying to keep from wreaking havoc on her school. When a kind stranger shows up with all the answers, Lexie hopes he’ll be able to help her control her newfound powers. But Gavon may not be as kind as he seems, and soon Lexie finds out that being magical is the least weird thing about her.

Spells and Sorcery is the first YA fantasy from S. Usher Evans, author of the Razia series, the Madion War Trilogy and Empath.

Goodreads / Amazon / Barnes & Noble / iBooks / Kobo

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Author Bio:

S. Usher Evans is an author, blogger, and witty banter aficionado. Born in Pensacola, Florida, she left the sleepy town behind for the fast-paced world of Washington, D.C.. There, she somehow landed jobs with BBC, Discovery Channel, and National Geographic Television before finally settling into a “real job” as an IT consultant. After a quarter life crisis at age 27, she decided consulting was for the birds and rekindled a childhood passion for writing novels. She sold everything she owned and moved back to Pensacola, where she currently resides with her two dogs, Zoe and Mr. Biscuit.

Evans is the author of the Razia series, Madion War Trilogy, and Empath, published by Sun’s Golden Ray Publishing.

Website / Goodreads / Facebook / Twitter

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My Review:

It has been awhile since I read ya fantasy, but when I saw the cover for Spells and Sorcery and read it’s synopsis, I knew I wanted to give it a try.

The story follows Lexie who, on her 15th birthday, finds out she has magical powers.
She and her sisters are witches. They lost their parents so their aunt (who is also a witch) took them under her roof.

I went into this book without high expectations, but with a lot of adrenaline (not literary, but you know what I mean).
I was on, ready to love it to bits and to finish it as fast as I could.

First thing didn’t happened, but the second one did!

I read this book in a record time – just one day!
Who’d say I could read 386 pages in just one day?
I certenly wouldn’t!

What I’m trying to tell you here is that the writing style is pretty easy to read and it makes you turn those pages even if the story is not too original nor interesting enough.

I came to conclusion that Evans has put so much energy into describing this world and how the magic system works, that in a way she forgot to make interesting side stories that would keep this book compelling.

There was no secondary stories then the main one. All that this book was about was Lexie finding out about magic and doing researches about this new system. It was like she had no life before her 15th birthday.

What bothered me the most was how she was always alone, without any friends to mention, while she was still going to public school she went to prior her birthday that changed her life.
There are only two people that are mentioned briefly: Joel and Callista, and Lexie didn’t even have a normal conversation with them through the whole story.
If she was a loner, bullied, rebel or someone no one wanted to talk to, I would understand, but in this case it felt like an author simply forgot to create a decent teenage life for her character.

Let me ask you this: do you think Harry Potter books (and I appologize to compare this book with HP because they are not similar at all, the only thing in common they have is magic) would be so good if Harry didn’t have Ron and Hermione by his side? If he was an outcast without friends, do you think people around the world would enjoy reading those books so much? I don’t think so, because friendship has a big part in those stories.

Here, there was a great potential to make Spells and Sorcery so much more interesting.
If Lexie had a friend by her side when exploring this new world and her abilities within it, this book would be so much more fascinating.

It surely wouldn’t feel like reading a magic encyclopedia as it felt at some points.

Another thing I didn’t like was how Lexie’s sisters left her all alone in this new situation she found herself in.
They were not helping her at all, and I can imagine that if they knew Lexie will get her powers at age of 15, they should have prepared her for it years ago.

That leads me to my third complain (or have I lost my count?): If her sister pepared her for what was coming, Lexie wouldn’t have to take instructions from some strange middle aged man who just showed up out of nowhere.

That was too weird (and I could see from the biginning who he really was because that was the only thing that was logical to me).
What was even weirder was how Lexie didn’t have the need to tell anyone about Gavon (that is his name) or how all she wanted to do was spend time with him (and now I’ll probably sound sick to some of you, especially if you read the book and know his story, but she wasn’t even attracted to him).

The last 5 chapters were the best in the story.
Everything before that felt like a slow overtire, and then, in the last 5 chapters, the real story began.

Overall, this was a quick story to pass time, and will probably appeal to younger audence.

3

 

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